Research & Analysis

on September 22, 2016

Since 2011, OBP has convened Working Group meetings for maritime stakeholders and experts to share information and discuss challenges and opportunities regarding how to address maritime piracy in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Gulf of Guinea. These meetings are always held under the Chatham House Rule in order to facilitate and encourage a frank and open exchange of views.


The Power of Networks in Maritime Security Report Cover
By Jens Vestergaard Madsen on September 16, 2016

Addressing the developing crisis around irregular migration by sea will require international institutions to work quickly to address the humanitarian, practical, and legal challenges posed by irregular migration.  Applying lessons learned from the effective international response to maritime piracy off the coast of Somalia may allow for international institutions to set up systems to address this new maritime issue.  This paper examines one particular lesson from the response to Somali piracy in terms of its applicability to maritime migration.  The use of international syst


By Jens Vestergaard Madsen, Conor Seyle on September 15, 2016

Understanding the Somali piracy crisis could make crossing the Mediterranean safer for refugees.


foreign policy analysis
By Curtis Bell, Patrick W. Keys on August 15, 2016

Few cross-national studies provide evidence of a relationship between environmental scarcity and conflict, although much of the literature claims that destabilizing effects of environmental crises can be mitigated by the right sociopolitical conditions. The authors analyzed drought severity and civil conflict in sub-Saharan Africa from 1962 to 2006 and uncovered some surprising results based on which and when sociopolitical conditions influenced the link between scarcity and conflict.


By Peter Kerins on July 10, 2016

Discussions of Somali piracy typically have focused on how piracy has affected the international community, but have rarely incorporated the local perspective. OBP conducted a series of interviews[1] along the Somali coast in order to give a voice to residents' attitudes towards piracy, and bring to light local perceptions of the current situation, including in traditional piracy hotspots.


Seafarer Report
By Conor Seyle, Chirag Bahri, Kellie Brandt, Alexander Dimitrievich, Karina Fernandez, Tom Holmer, Niyati Malhotra on June 24, 2016

More than 3,000 seafarers have been held hostage by Somali pirates since 2001, with a significant, but unknown, number of seafarers kidnapped in other parts of the world. These seafarers, and their families, have faced fear and uncertainty, and in some cases, direct abuse. In addition to the 41 seafarers who remain in captivity as of the release of this report, the thousands of seafarers who have returned to their regular lives after being held hostage must address the challenges of reintegration and coping with their experiences.


on June 22, 2016

The establishment of the new MDAT-GOG reporting "network" in the Gulf of Guinea and the associated changes to UKHO chart Q6114, have raised odd questions about the definitions and purpose of risk and reporting areas associated with maritime piracy. In general terms, these areas are meant to help establish situational awareness of maritime traffic, threats and response options to help vulnerable shipping vessels.


Somali Investment Survey Report
By Jay Benson, Lee C. Sorensen, Alexandria E. Wise, Lindsay Heger on June 16, 2016

As the Somali regions continue to emerge from decades of civil war, investment is expanding, banks are opening their doors, and Somali exports are increasingly finding markets. Those most anxious to embrace the growing Somali private sector and encourage expansion of Somali product exports to foreign markets are members of the Somali diaspora around the world. Through remittances and small investments, these individuals provide a critical lifeline for individuals in the Somali regions, as well as for businesses.


Glass Ceilings Broken by Hillary Clinton
By Curtis Bell on June 14, 2016

This paper leverages data from the fifty democracies that have had a female leader to better understand how women in the highest levels of government affect women’s representation in other elected offices. The experiences of these countries offer little reason to believe a first female president or prime minister will soon be followed by another woman in power.


By Carly Meredith, Jens Vestergaard Madsen, Marilyn Venney, Matt Walje, Peter Kerins on June 6, 2016

This year's report marks the sixth year that Oceans Beyond Piracy has assessed the human and economic cost of maritime piracy. Over the years the report has evolved and our focus has expanded from piracy off the coast of Somalia to piracy in the Gulf of Guinea, and finally to piracy and robbery at sea in Southeast Asia. What has remained constant is our goal to explain and quantify the magnitude of these crimes and the profound impacts it has had on stakeholders from governments, industry, and most importantly, its victims.


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