Research & Analysis

on December 16, 2016

This paper provides information on the different types of contracted maritime security services currently in use, and outlines the oversight mechanisms that govern them.


By Conor Seyle on November 29, 2016

A major contribution to the prevention and cessation of mass atrocities was the development of the “Responsibility to Protect” as a formal commitment by United Nations member states. Known as  R2P, the principle affirmed member states’ commitment under international law to prevent and stop atrocities within their own borders and elsewhere. Since its inception, R2P has been controversial, and there has been debate over how to operationalize and support it.


on November 4, 2016

There are numerous examples of ways in which the business sector has been and continues to be involved in activities that lead to mass atrocity crimes. These include instances such as when business cooperates with abusive state security services to violently suppress dissent, telecommunication companies allow dissemination of hate messages on their platforms, and firms deal with conflict minerals.


Business and R2P
By John Forrer, Conor Seyle on November 4, 2016

In 2005 the member states of the UN committed to preventing and stopping the mass atrocity crimes of genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing, and crimes against humanity.  This commitment was formally called the “Responsibility to Protect” (R2P), and it clarified states' obligations under international law to stop and prevent these atrocities. Since the adoption of R2P, the majority of international policy and practice has focused on what state governments can do to operationalize this commitment. This book examines the role of the private sector as a potential ally in th


Advancing National Action Plans on Women, Peace, and Security
By Alexandra Amling, Marie O'Reilly on October 18, 2016

Evidence shows that women’s participation in peace and security processes is linked to a greater likelihood of successful outcomes, and international frameworks have sprung up accordingly. What is less understood is the role of national initiatives. National Action Plans (NAPs) to implement UN Resolution 1325 on women, peace, and security have tripled since 2010, but what impact do these plans have?


Climate Change and Conflict in Sub-Saharan Africa
By Curtis Bell on September 29, 2016

Some argue that climate change effects pose one of the greatest risks for political violence, and others argue there is no relationship whatsoever. A new study shows that there is gray area between the two sides, and offers policy implications for international donors. 


on September 22, 2016

Since 2011, OBP has convened Working Group meetings for maritime stakeholders and experts to share information and discuss challenges and opportunities regarding how to address maritime piracy in the Western Indian Ocean and in the Gulf of Guinea. These meetings are always held under the Chatham House Rule in order to facilitate and encourage a frank and open exchange of views.


The Power of Networks in Maritime Security Report Cover
By Jens Vestergaard Madsen on September 16, 2016

Addressing the developing crisis around irregular migration by sea will require international institutions to work quickly to address the humanitarian, practical, and legal challenges posed by irregular migration.  Applying lessons learned from the effective international response to maritime piracy off the coast of Somalia may allow for international institutions to set up systems to address this new maritime issue.  This paper examines one particular lesson from the response to Somali piracy in terms of its applicability to maritime migration.  The use of international syst


By Jens Vestergaard Madsen, Conor Seyle on September 15, 2016

Understanding the Somali piracy crisis could make crossing the Mediterranean safer for refugees.


foreign policy analysis
By Curtis Bell, Patrick W. Keys on August 15, 2016

Few cross-national studies provide evidence of a relationship between environmental scarcity and conflict, although much of the literature claims that destabilizing effects of environmental crises can be mitigated by the right sociopolitical conditions. The authors analyzed drought severity and civil conflict in sub-Saharan Africa from 1962 to 2006 and uncovered some surprising results based on which and when sociopolitical conditions influenced the link between scarcity and conflict.


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