Research & Analysis

Business Ecosystem in Somalia
By Victor Odundo Owuor on March 4, 2015

Business associations can be an effective tool for facilitating good governance, but are an often incorrectly understood concept even by individuals close to the institutions.  This paper introduces the potential benefit in the formation of business associations  and provides a discussion about the challenges to business associations in post-conflict scenarios and the experience of regional African countries in the formation of these institutions.


Renewable Energy In Somalia
By Jami Nelson Nuñez on March 4, 2015

This report describes the evolving landscape of energy in the country and outlines the burden of limited electricity services and extremely high tariffs on households, businesses, and the environment.


on February 27, 2015

OBP welcomes the news of the release of the remaining four Thai crew members of the FV Prantalay 12 on 25 February 2015, 1,774 days after being taken hostage by pirates off the coast of Somalia.


on January 22, 2015

In response to the continued challenges of piracy in East Africa and the Western Indian Ocean, a number of initiatives have been developed both regionally and internationally. Among the most prominent initiatives are the International Information Sharing Centers that are currently operating or are planned for the region. The featured chart gives an overview of the proposed and operating Information Sharing Centers in East Africa.  


Private Sector and Business role in atrocity crimes
By One Earth Future on December 19, 2014

This policy brief is based on “The Role of Business in the Responsibility to Protect,” a chapter which appeared in The Responsibility to Protect and the Third Pillar: Legitimacy and Operationalization. This chapter, by Conor Seyle and Eamon Aloyo, reviewed existing research on the Responsibility to Protect and the role of business in security and conflict to argue that there is a concrete role for private-sector actors to contribute to the “timely and decisive response” to violations of the Responsibility to Protect that characterized “Third-Pillar” responses.


By Jens Vestergaard Madsen on December 11, 2014

Introdoctory brochure of the CGPCS Technical Subgroup on Maritime Situational Awareness in the Western Indian Ocean.  Analysis of future information sharing requirements in the maritime domain of the Western Indian Ocean.


L. Heger in Journal of Peace Research
By Lindsay Heger on December 5, 2014

Many of the world’s most infamous terrorist organizations demonstrate clear political aptitude, maintaining highly successful political parties while simultaneously carrying out terrorist attacks. Yet the relationship between terrorism and a group’s political fortune is unclear. Groups like Hamas and Hezbollah appear to have gained significant sup- port as a consequence of certain attacks, most notably those against US and Israeli targets. Other organizations fight for their political life after certain attacks.


By Noah D. Lombardo on November 21, 2014

The increase in global maritime piracy, particularly in the Western Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden and in the Gulf of Guinea off West Africa, has developed into a serious threat to maritime shipping, demanding the attention of international organizations and states around the world. Combating this problem requires a significant amount of manpower, resources, and collaboration. Piracy distinguishes itself from many other international crimes in that it by definition occurs on the high seas, outside the jurisdiction of any state.


A Gap Exists in Research and Implementation
By Chris Cyr, Lindsay Heger on November 7, 2014

In recent decades, many who are involved in international relations and foreign policy have bemoaned the increasing divide between what practitioners do and the issues scholars research. Accusations from both sides have detailed what appear to be entrenched institutional cultures with few possibilities for change. The bridge linking these two communities appears to be broken. Despite myriad attacks, evidence on either side of the divide is desperately lacking.


Competition and Cooperation in Classroom
By Joseph Kim, Peter Taylor, Pat Barclay on October 23, 2014

Instructors of large classes often face challenges with student motivation. The classroom incentive structure – grades, extra credit, and instructor and peer acknowledgement – may shape student motivations to engage in their studies. Over the course of a year, students in the introductory psychology course at McMaster University took part in an experiment to test whether competition could affect student achievement, engagement and peer interaction. Cooperation and Competition in Large Classrooms evaluated the effects of competition on student performance and the learning environment.


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